Tuesday, October 7, 2014

#GRA14 Fourteenth Goldfish

Fourth Year Event
Global Read Aloud 2014
The Fourteenth Goldfish


What is the Global Read Aloud?

The project was created in 2010 by Pernille Ripp with a simple goal in mind; one book to connect the world. Now with four years under our belt and more than 200,000 connections made, we realize we are on to something larger than us so we look forward to continuing the global connections.

The premise is simple; we pick a book to read aloud to our students during a set 6-week period and during that time we try to make as many global connections as possible.

What are we reading this year?

 This year we are reading The Fourteenth Goldfish by Jennifer Holm. Students have a copy to follow along with to build their sight vocabulary and listening vocabulary. This book will serve as a mentor text, a text we refer to as we learn our reading and writing skills. We've already learned about good description and character development: here's an example from the book:

"This kid's wearing a rumpled pinstripe shirt, khaki polyester pants, a tweed jacket with patches on the elbows, and leather shoes."

"I study the boy-- the gray-tipped hair, the way he's standing so comfortably in our hall, how his right hand opens and closes as if used to grasping something by habit. But it's the heavy gold ring hanging loosely on his middle finger that draws my eye."

This will help us when we read other books -- to notice how the character is created by the author. This will help when we write -- as an example of using precise words to create a mind movie for the reader of our own stories.


Who will we connect with this year?

We have connected with one school in Hawaii so far, and we'll find more. You can follow our journey in several places: TACKK, LAGoals, 567 Kidblogs, and 8 Edublogs [ see student list at right]. Some students still have permission slips to turn in.

Our TACKK is already a "featured" page! There it is at top left in the pic below!


Be sure to ask your students about our work. Grade six drew some excellent scenes from the story today, and they will share their ideas about their scenes tomorrow. Grade five students are working on their images as well. Grade seven and eight predicted ideas about the book on TACKK.

Check back for more info!
 





This is a school related site so please respect others and comment appropriately. Please contact Ms Edwards if you have any questions or need to report any inappropriate activity. Thank you. Reflect Curiosity and Wonder... Go boldly and scatter seeds of kindness...

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Collaboration Practice

connectkindly

Collaboration is a part of our learning each day.

The Common Core State Standards include collaboration as a key component [ See Speaking and Listening Standards as an example ].  Collaboration, though, requires listening and discussing skills and strategies that many students find difficult. Are there ways to promote practice of these so students acquire them as a daily habit?
I learned a strategey that my students enjoy from Joy Kirr, a Twitter colleague. She posted a "Find Your Seat" activity for five days at the beginning of the year. I've added to that; we're still "collaborating" to organize ourselves in groups every day as an entry task.  
After the first day, we wrote in our interactive notebooks what we did as a "learning community" to be successful at the task. That became our class guidelines.
What are our activities?  Collaborative Seating Slides. The first five are adapted from Joy's work; the rest I keep adding to; each day we review our Learning Community class guidelines and acknowledge how much we've improved as collaborators and learners.  We discuss who was a leader that day in helping to organize, who asked questions to clarify, who helped, who added an idea, etc. Each day students are improving in their openness and appropriate requests and conversations. Each day another student takes the lead, each day they learn better ways to interact with and involve their peers, and each day they learn positive ways to encourage each other. Most importantly, the students are collaborating not just with their usual friends, but with whomever is in their group that day. If students can speak up, lead, discuss with each of their classmates, including those they may not have chosen, then we are well on our way to becoming connected learners with peers around the world.  

And we continue our Dot Day goals while collaborating.:

Click image to enlarge.
 
 Students, which learning community guideline do you think is most important?



This is a school related site so please respect others and comment appropriately. Please contact Ms Edwards if you have any questions or need to report any inappropriate activity. Thank you. Reflect Curiosity and Wonder... Go boldly and scatter seeds of kindness...